fbpx
Your IP: 216.18.204.202 Your location: United States Your status: Unprotected

How to Stay Private and Secure on LinkedIn

Every modern Internet user surely knows that LinkedIn is the most famous and definitely the best social network for any work. Since this is such a highly professional social networking site as a resume, our priority is to do everything to protect your privacy. Plus, after LinkedIn has been on the news in recent years due to massive privacy violations.

With such gaps in the site’s security, how can you keep yourself and your information private while using that platform?
Today we’ll tell you how to stay secure on LinkedIn.

How to Stay Private and Secure on LinkedIn
How to Stay Private and Secure on LinkedIn

The first step

We advise you to update your password regularly.
To our great regret, almost no one follows this advice, and ultimately personal data suffers because of this. You must use a combination of capital letters, numbers, letters, and punctuation.

The second step

Be sure to check your privacy settings.
Although LinkedIn has many built-in security systems, you can do no less to protect yourself. If you want to do it better – do it yourself, right?

The third step

Beware of phishing.

You can read about it on our blog in a separate article and why Zorro VPN is so important in order to protect you from different types of hackers. Phishing is very popular nowadays and moreover, a growing tactic used by criminals for stealing your information and your money. Usually, they impersonate your friends or a well-known company and ask you to click on the link or download the attachment.

The fourth and last

You should definitely use Zorro VPN (a virtual private network). It will encrypt all your messages, as well as anonymize you when you are online so that no one can tell where you are.
With these tips, you will be much more private and secure while using LinkedIn.

Enjoy all-around secure
internet protection
Protect against cyber attacks on public networks
download Zorro VPN
Related articles